Digital Continuity

Digital Continuity

Digital continuity is the ability to have all of the data about a product, system or infrastructure, during the different processes in its life span: Development – Manufacturing – Maintenance. In order to digitally follow the evolution of these products, we use two models, called "digital twins": the theoretical model representing a configuration (as designed) and a representative model of the specific manufactured product (as built). The co-existence of these 2 models may lead to industrial applications that all have the objective of simulating industrial situations before they occur, with a resulting efficiency and lead-time gain during application or verification.

BIM

The purpose of BIM (Building Information Modeling) is to provide our factories with digital tools to optimize the performance of the Facility Management and SSE activities. For our existing factories, BIM is organized in three steps. The first involves digitizing all production areas using a 3D scanner. The second step is modeling, where each structural element in the buildings is identified. Finally, the last step: the creation of the full digital model of the plant in 3D. This process will make it easier and quicker to manage plant changes, such as the reorganization of workshops or the installation of new machines. The tool will also allow us to optimize machine maintenance and the monitoring of energy consumption. For plants currently being created, the objective is to have this model from the design phase and to maintain it through the plant operation phase.

BIM

Engineering 4.0

Engineering is a multi-disciplinary study of different industrial projects that encompass economic, technological, human and financial aspects. It requires overall coordination of the work and the results of several specialized teams, which is called development processes.

The objective is to design and prepare the production of components and assemblies that will achieve the performance expected by the clients and the level of validation/certification required for our aeronautic applications, while meeting the Group’s financial and human needs.

For development to be effective, there must be concurrent engineering which consists of ensuring all of the specialists work in concert. To do this, they must continuously share the same vision of the product being developed, and constantly expand this vision through the changes that their expertise determines must be made, while enabling the specialists in other fields to assess the results of these changes.

Digital technologies thus lead to gains in efficiency in each sector (system engineering, design, simulations, manufacturing engineering and services), both through the digitization of the technical data and by automating processing without the need for manual intervention by a specialist. Each specialist can thus focus on the most important decisions that need to be made.

MES: a software for a 4.0 workshop

The product and process benchmark for the design and industrialization phases results from two software packages: PLM (Product Lifecycle Management) and MEDS(Manufacturing Engineering Data System). The production management systems benchmark for the organization of means and resources, in order to meet client demand, is provided by the ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning). To link them, the information system that lets the producer both identify the technical and management benchmark to be applied and send it to the production data information systems is the MES (Manufacturing Execution System).